If you’ve ever been to the drone academy pages of the FreeFlight 3 app, you might have taken a look at your flight’s statistics. A dedicated developer, Kenth Jensen, developed a tool to use these kinds of data collected by your drone every time you fly. It allows you to add some of these data to your videos. You can for instance display the altitude of the Bebop. Here is a good example of what can be done :

 

 

To do as in the video, you’ll need 2 softwares:

– Download and install Garmin Virb Edit (it’s free). The following guide is for using Garmin Virb 3.1.0, in other versions the UI can be different.

–  Download the Pud2GpxKmlCsv developed by Kenth Jensen (make sure it’s the latest version)

You’ll need to unzip the Pud2GpxKmlCsv file and execute it. If Garmin Virb Edit is already installed, press the button ‘Install Garmin Virb GPS Overlay Templates on PC’ in the Pud2GpxKmlCsv tool, select if you want to use template using feet or meters.

 Capture 2

1. Generate Gpx file via Pud2GpxKmlCsv tool

  1. Make sure you have created an account in the Drone Academy in the FreeFlight app on your tablet / PC
  2. Make a flight with the Bebop and wait for the flight to be available in the Drone Academy, make sure the tablet / phone is connected to your wifi for the flight data to be uploaded
  3. Copy the mp4 video from the Bebop into a folder on your PC
  4. In the Pud2GpxKmlCsv tool, press ‘Load data from Drone Academy’
  5. Enter your username and password for the Drone Academy and press ‘Get list of flights…..’
  6. Locate the flight you want to load, based on the time, date and estimated address, if the flight is not in the list, make sure your tablet / PC is connected to your wifi, and maybe wait a while for the flight to be available, double click to select a flight
  7. A graph of the flight is being shown, containing Altitude, Speed, Battery and Distance, if you hold the mouse over the graph, you will get more details of the graph, you can switch to map view by the button in the left lower corner.
  8. Press ‘Export Files’ select where to save the 3 files, a gpx file for Garmin Virb Edit, a kml file for Google Earth and a csv file for Excel, a good idea is to export the files to the same folder as you copied the mp4 video file earlier.

2. Generate GPS overlay to video in Garmin Virb Edit

  1. Open ‘Virb Edit’
  2. Press ‘Create Video’
  3. Pick a name for your video, it will be used for filename of your video later
  4. Now you should be in the ‘Media Library’, press the ‘Import Clips & Photos’
  5. Press ‘Import Other’
  6. Select the mp4 video from the Bebop
  7. Press ‘Import only’
  8. Click ‘OK, when it’s indicating that the library is updated, now the video is added to the Media Library.
  9. Drag and drop the video to the area with the text ‘Drag and drop clips here to add them to your video’
  10. Press the ‘G-Metrix’ in the left side followed by pressing the ‘Import G-Metrix’ button
  11. Now press ‘On My Computer’ to the left  followed by ‘Browse’ in the middle of the window.
  12. Now select the gpx file created by the Pud2GpxKmlCsv tool
  13. A Gps track shall be displayed now, if everything looks correct, then press ‘Use this Log’
  14. Click the ‘Overlays’ button on the left side
  15. If not already selected, click the ‘Templates’ tab on the top.
  16. Locate the template called ‘Bebop template 1’ or ‘Bebop Template 2’ by holding the mouse over the different templates, then click on the template
  17. The different gauges is now added to the video, if you want, you can delete or move the various gauges on the screen and save it into a new template
  18. Click the play icon to see your video, here the video is not shown 100 % correctly and video can be really slow in updating.
  19. Sometimes the video and GPS overlays are not completely in sync, you can manually sync it the following way: Click the ‘G-Metrix’ button on the left side and select ‘G-Metrix Sync’ in the right side, after you have synchronized it correctly press ‘Done’
  20. Now export the video by clicking ‘Export’ in the upper right hand side.
  21. Select ‘HD 1080p’ and ’30 fps’ for highest quality, the Bebop only saves video at 30 fps, so no reason for selecting ’60 fps’
  22. Select where to save the video under ‘Pick export location’ and press ‘Export’
  23. Now wait somewhere between half an hour and up to 3 hours depending on the length of the video and the speed of your PC
  24. That’s it, now your video is finish, simple as that :o)

Templates for Garmin Virb Edit

If you would like to use the GPS overlay templates created especially for Bebop drone, then just click on the button “Install Garmin Virb GPS overlay Templates to PC” in the Pud2GpxKmlCsv tool

If you instead use on of the default templates in Garmin Virb, you will not be able to get “Distance in meters”, “Battery level” and “Orientation of drone” shown correctly
You can either modify an existing template or you can use one of the templates created especially for Bebop drone for Garmin Virb, as seen on the screendump above and below.
Another GPS overlay template will also be installed by the tool “Bebop Template 2”, designed by Jack Z, Thank you for that Jack.

Change language in Garmin Virb
As default Garmin Virb uses the same language as your windows installation, that means that there is a risk that all the text on the various gauges can be in your local language, such as km/h and pitch/roll. You can set the language to english by simply pressing the button in the tool.

 

Getting pud files out of the drone

In the latest version of the tool, the flight data can be loaded directly from the Drone Academy, but if you prefer to use the pud files directly from the Bebop, then follow the procedure below.

 

1. Get the PUD file

The first thing you’ll need is the PUD file from your Bebop. This file contains all sorts of data regarding your flight. This is the file that’s used for your statistics on drone academy. The thing is, for now, the Bebop deletes this file quickly after landing to keep as much free space as possible. There will be an update soon that will make it a lot easier to access it from FreeFlight 3. For now,  the easiest way to get the PUD file on your PC is to kill/close the FreeFlight 3 App before landing if you’re using a Skycontroller or right landing if you’re flying the Bebop with your smartphone or tablet. Then, you connect your computer to the Bebop’s WiFi and you can download the PUD file from either:  ftp://192.168.42.1/internal_000/Bebop_Drone/academy/ , or or simply press the button “Get Pud files from Bebop drone” in Pud2GpxKmlCsv.

You then need to get the video file from your bebop and save it in the same file as the PUD file.

2. Convert the PUD file with Pud2GpxKmlCsv tool

  • In the Pud2GpxKmlCsv tool, press ‘Load Pud file’ and select the pud file
  • Press ‘Convert file’ and wait a short while
  • A graph of the flight is being shown, containing Altitude, Speed, Battery and Distance, if you hold the mouse over the graph, you will get more details of the graph.
  • In the folder where the pud file is located, 3 extra files have been created by the Pud2GpxKmlCsv tool, a gpx file for Garmin Virb Edit, a kml file for Google Earth and a csv file for Excel

Capture

 

3. Edit the video with Virb Edit

Open Virb Edit

  • Press ‘Create Video’
  • Pick a name for your video, it will be used for filename of your video later
  • In the lower left hand corner press the arrow down next to the ‘Clip Library’
  • Press ‘Import Other’
  • Select the mp4 video from the Bebop
  • Press ‘Import only’
  • Click ‘OK, when it’s indicating that the library is updated
  • Drag and drop the video from the lower left hand corner to the timeline
  • Click the ‘Overlays’ icon in the toolbox below
  • Click ‘Add GPS’
  • Click ‘Manual Selection’ on the left side and click ‘Browse’
  • Now select the gpx file created by the Pud2GpxKmlCsv tool
  • Click ‘Done’
  • Click the ‘Overlays’ icon again in the toolbox below
  • If not already selected, click the ‘Templates’ tab on the right side
  • Locate the template called ‘Bebop template 1’ or ‘Bebop Template 2’ by holding the mouse over the different templates, then click on the template
  • The different gauges is now added to the video, if you want, you can delete or move the various gauges on the screen and save it into a new template
  • Click the play icon to see your video, here the video is not shown 100 % correctly and video can be really slow in updating.
  • Sometimes the video and GPS overlays are not completely in sync, you can manually sync it the following way: Click the ‘Edit’ icon (a scissor) in the toolbox below and press ‘GPS Sync’ in the right side, after you have synchronized it correctly press ‘Done’
  • Now export the video by clicking ‘Export’ in the upper right hand side.
  • Select ‘HD 1080p’ and ’30 fps’ for highest quality, the Bebop only saves video at 30 fps, so no reason for selecting ’60 fps’
  • Select where to save the video under ‘Pick export location’ and press ‘Export’

 

That’s it !

 

We want to thank Kenth Jensen for creating an efficient and simple software. On top of that he did write a good tutorial for it. Let’s be honest here we borrowed a lot from his tutorial. Feel free to read his tutorial if you’re looking for more information.

If you know how to use telnet you can find a code here that well pr’event the PUD file from being deleted (it’s in french but it the code is universal). The next update will make it much easier but this can be used in-between.